2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale
2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale__right

All pages and cover are intact. Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the Library of" labels. Shrink wrap, dust jacket, or boxed set case may be missing. ITEM MAY NOT INCLUDE BUNDLED MEDIA. There may be some corner curling or creasing. A name or inscription may be on the inside of the front cover. Item may have minor cosmetic defects (marks, wears, cuts, bends, crushes) on the cover, spine, pages or dust cover.
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Description

Product Description

Kay Redfield Jamison, award-winning professor and writer, changed the way we think about moods and madness. Now Jamison uses her characteristic honesty, wit and eloquence to look back at her relationship with her husband, Richard Wyatt, a renowned scientist who died of cancer. Nothing was the Same is a penetrating psychological study of grief viewed from deep inside the experience itself.

Review

A Washington Post Best Book of the Year

“A cleared-eyed view of illness and death, sanity and insanity, love and grief. . . . Spare. . . . Poetic. . . . Piercing. . . . The great gift Jamison offers here, beyond her honesty and the beauty of her writing, is perspective. . . . To write the truth with such passion and grace is remarkable enough. To do this in loving memory of a partner is tribute indeed.”
The Washington Post

“In An Unquiet Mind, Kay Jamison wrote with exceptional bravery and grace about living through mania, paralyzing depressions, and a suicide attempt. Here, with the same strength of mind and sweetness of spirit, she writes about her husband’s [death] as well as her own struggles with loss and grief. . . . Because Jamison understands depression so well, she is able to make the distinctions between depression and grief with great precision and sensitivity.”
The Boston Globe

“Fascinating. . . . Captivating. . . . As one who has experienced clinical depression, [Jamison] is in a singular position to compare it with grief . . . . In this slim, intense memoir Jamison shows us that mourning leads us back to life.”
—Michael Greenberg, The New York Times Book Review
 
“A meditation on grief as necessary and inevitable, and not to be confused with mental illness. . . . Insightful. . . . Elegantly written. . . . It’s a credit to the warmth and intimacy of Jamison’s voice that we connect with her underlying message: Tragedy doesn’t discriminate.”
Los Angeles Times

“Elegiac and emotionally precise.”
O, The Oprah Magazine
 
“A wonderful book. Jamison has the ability to make love seem so real and reachable; her writing always makes me happy to speak and write the English language. It contains great beauty.”
—Pat Conroy, author of The Prince of Tides and South of Broad
 
“This is a finely told midlife love story, a romance as elegant as it is doomed. . . . What a couple she and her husband made! . . . Jamison writes simply and believably.”
AARP Magazine
 
“A soul-baring love letter.”
Kirkus Reviews
 
“Sober yet heartening. . . . Jamison is at her most insightful drawing distinctions between [mental illness] and mourning.”
The Washingtonian
 
“A unique account, filled with exquisitely wrought nuances of emotion, of her husband’s death. . . . In her brilliant explication distinguishing between madness and grief, her battle to remain sane is as stirring as his to beat cancer.”
Booklist (starred review)

About the Author

KAY REDFIELD JAMISON is a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as well as an honorary professor of English at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. She is the author of the national best sellers An Unquiet Mind, Night Falls Fast, and Touched with Fire. She is coauthor of the standard medical text on manic-depressive illness and author or coauthor of more than one hundred scientific papers about mood disorders, creativity, and psychopharmacology. Dr. Jamison, the recipient of numerous national and international scientific awards, is a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The love you gave me wasn''t fresh and young,
It didn''t melt the sun or set the town aflame.
But it was warm and wise as any street,
Where hope and sorrow meet in bars without a name.
I only know that one day was a drink
And then the next was you and nothing was the same.

—STUART MACGREGOR

Prologue

When I was young, I thought that fearlessness and an easy way with love would see me to the other side of anything. Madness taught me otherwise. In the wake of my first insanity I assumed less and doubted more. My mind was suspect; there was no arguing with the new reality. I had to learn to live with a brain that demanded more coddling than I would have liked and, because of this, I avoided perturbance as best I could. Needwise, I avoided love.

I kept my mind on a short lead and my heart yet closer in; had I cared enough to look I doubt I would have recognized either of them. Before mania whipped through my brain I had been curious always to go to the far field, beyond what lay nearest by. After, I drew back from life and watered down my dreams. I retaught myself to think and to negotiate the world, and as the world measures things, I did well enough.

I was content in my life and found purpose in academic and clinical work. I wrote and taught, saw patients, and kept my struggles with manic-depressive illness to myself. I worked hard, driven to understand the illness from which I suffered. I settled in, I settled down, I settled. In a slow and fitful way, predictability insinuated itself into my life, and with it came a certain peace I was not aware had been missing. Grateful for this, and because I had no reason to know otherwise, I assumed that peace was provisional upon an absence of passion or anything that could forcibly disturb my senses. I avoided love.

This lasted for a while, although not perhaps as long as it seemed. Then I met a man who upended my cautious stance toward life. He did not believe, as I had for so long, that to control my mind I must first control my heart. He loved the woman he imagined I must have been before bowing to fear. He prodded my resistance with grace and undermined my wariness with laughter. He could say the unthinkable because he instinctively knew that his dry wit and gentle ways would win me over. They did. He was deft with my shifting moods and did not abuse our passion. He liked my fearlessness, and he brought it back as a gift to me. Far from finding
the intensity of my nature disturbing, he gravitated toward it. He induced me to risk much by assuming a portion of the risk himself, and he persuaded me to write from my heart. He loved in me what I had forgotten was there.

We had nearly twenty years together. He was my husband, colleague, and friend; when he became ill and we knew he would die, he became my mentor in how to die with the grace by which he lived. What he could not teach me—no one could—was how to contend with the grief of losing him.

It has been said that grief is a kind of madness. I disagree. There is a sanity to grief, in its just proportion of emotion to cause, that madness does not have. Grief, given to all, is a generative and human thing. It provides a path, albeit a broken one, by which those who grieve can find their way. Still, it is grief''s fugitive nature that one does not know at the start that such a path exists. I knew madness well, but I understood little of grief, and I was not always certain which was grief and which was madness. Grief, as it transpires, has its own territory.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
127 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

microbe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Highly recommended
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2014
There are dozens of books about grief, but most of them are shallow, transparent and unhelpful. These books offer hackneyed and sentimental statements that read like a greeting card, "there there, my dear". Others try to impose an imaginary structure on grief,... See more
There are dozens of books about grief, but most of them are shallow, transparent and unhelpful. These books offer hackneyed and sentimental statements that read like a greeting card, "there there, my dear". Others try to impose an imaginary structure on grief, describing it in lock-step "stages" for the reader to go through. Some even describe grief as if it were a mental illness. Anyone who has been through the loss of a beloved parent, sibling, child or spouse will find these approaches lacking if not downright annoying. Actually, the most reassuring books are those that were not written to reassure. They do not gloss over what the reader is going through and they do not try to tell the reader what to feel. This book is one of those.

Jamison''s book belongs in the top rank along with C.S. Lewis'' A Grief Observed. She is a highly literate, sensitive writer who describes the loss of her husband to cancer and how they both grieved over what was happening to them. One especially helpful chapter is on the difference between grief and depression. Dr. Jamison is a world-recognized authority on mood disorders and has also written in the past of her own struggle with manic-depressive illness. As one who has suffered true depression in the past and now is experiencing real grief, she clearly distinguishes between them. Grief may make a person feel like they are going crazy, but it is not depression or any other mental illness.

Highly recommended for anyone who is trying to understand their own or someone else''s grief.
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Sirena
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I love all of Kay Jamison''s books and this one was ...
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2015
I love all of Kay Jamison''s books and this one was no different. This is not light reading. This is soul-wrenching, heartbreak reading. I can''t remember a chapter where I didn''t cry. It also made me feel profoundly grateful for the love I have in my life. She so eloquently... See more
I love all of Kay Jamison''s books and this one was no different. This is not light reading. This is soul-wrenching, heartbreak reading. I can''t remember a chapter where I didn''t cry. It also made me feel profoundly grateful for the love I have in my life. She so eloquently describes their beautiful relationship and how, in remembrance of their bond, she was able to heal from her tragic loss.
8 people found this helpful
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Louise
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unvarnished Truth
Reviewed in the United States on July 26, 2011
This is a book full of the emotional honestly I''ve come to expect and enjoy by this author. She does a skillful and elegant job of parsing the differences between clinical/bipolar depression and grief. As someone with bipolar disorder, her discoveries are invaluable.... See more
This is a book full of the emotional honestly I''ve come to expect and enjoy by this author. She does a skillful and elegant job of parsing the differences between clinical/bipolar depression and grief. As someone with bipolar disorder, her discoveries are invaluable. Jamison is so fully present to her loss and her wide range of feelings, she never ''loses it'' in the way one can with this disorder when environmental stability is rocked.

She referred numerous times to the book she was writing at the time of Dr. Wyatt''s decline, the book on passionate exuberance - and it''s almost unbelievable to see her tend to her personal life while writing this book on a subject nowhere close to her daily reality.

If you enjoy this book, I strongly encourage you to read her other books.
11 people found this helpful
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Wrensong
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Beautiful Anguish
Reviewed in the United States on April 27, 2018
Reading this book is like reliving and experiencing the love, delight, pain and terrible ache of loss. However it is a kindness for a bi-polar person to examine the differences between loss and madness. The line had seemed so thin to me and now I realize it is so much... See more
Reading this book is like reliving and experiencing the love, delight, pain and terrible ache of loss. However it is a kindness for a bi-polar person to examine the differences between loss and madness. The line had seemed so thin to me and now I realize it is so much bolder and I that I am too.
2 people found this helpful
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Diane Hickman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is a must read for everyone who suffers from mood disorders and the pain of grief from loss.
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2016
This book is a riveting account of love, life, and loss. It also provides hopefulness love and life transcends the pain of grief. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is struggling with grief. It is also a must read for people with bipolar illness who needs a first... See more
This book is a riveting account of love, life, and loss. It also provides hopefulness love and life transcends the pain of grief. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is struggling with grief. It is also a must read for people with bipolar illness who needs a first hand depiction about the distinction between symptoms of the illness and the experience of grief.
6 people found this helpful
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Claire Victor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
nothing was the same by Kay Redfield Jamison
Reviewed in the United States on October 5, 2010
I saw Kay Redfield Jamison on the Charlie Rose show, during the brain series, at which time she shared her experiences and knowledge about manic depression. I was very much impressed by her beauty, charm and sense of humor in discussing the disease. Her beautifully... See more
I saw Kay Redfield Jamison on the Charlie Rose show, during the brain series, at which time she shared her experiences and knowledge about manic depression. I was very much impressed by her beauty, charm and sense of humor in discussing the disease.
Her beautifully written memoir, Nothing Was the Same, is a heartbreaking love story, with the insight of a brilliant mind of a women who is at the same time a sufferer of manic depression and a scientist. The love and life she shared with her brilliant and caring husband had such pathos and delight. Her council to her patients on page 196 really is a guide for all to think about and practice!
I am now reading An Unquiet Mind in which she describes with vivid detail her experiences with this disease. How fortunate her students and patients are for her insight, compassion, sense of humor, and empathy.

Juliet Saraydar
9 people found this helpful
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Trudy Barnes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
WINDOW INTO GRIEF
Reviewed in the United States on October 11, 2009
I had read "An Unquiet Mind" and was so impressed with the author''s writing ability. It was passionately expressed, very eloguent and descriptive. So, when I read that her new book of memoirs about her deceased husband was coming soon, I ordered it in advance. I just... See more
I had read "An Unquiet Mind" and was so impressed with the author''s writing ability. It was passionately expressed, very eloguent and descriptive. So, when I read that her new book of memoirs about her deceased husband was coming soon, I ordered it in advance. I just finished her book "Nothing was the Same" and appreciated her perspectives about grieving, and the power of taking time to be quiet, to remember and to go through personal affects when the time is right. I found her book to be respectful, sacred and tender. My mother passed away 6 months ago, and so it was healing to go through the process she described along with her. Great book for anyone who has a chronically ill loved one, or who is grieving a death.
4 people found this helpful
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James P. Riggs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loss is Painful!
Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2009
I found this memoir difficult to put down and difficult to read at the same time! Her telling of this engaging relationship is nothing short of profound and simple. Profound in that two people of such keen sharp minds sustained a loving bond and dealt with adversity that... See more
I found this memoir difficult to put down and difficult to read at the same time! Her telling of this engaging relationship is nothing short of profound and simple. Profound in that two people of such keen sharp minds sustained a loving bond and dealt with adversity that would break an ordinary marriage. Simple in that they were passionately in love, counting the days and moments before death would bring it to an earthly conclusion. Difficult to read, but so fulfilling to have savored the feelings!
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Top reviews from other countries

Fairy Mary666
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another brilliant read from Kay Redfield Jamison
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 9, 2016
Fast delivery and a great price. Another brilliant book from Kay Redfield Jamison. Touching, thoughtful and very interesting. Highly recommended.
One person found this helpful
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Mariusz Kulesza
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 13, 2016
It''s a good book but not as good as "Unquiet Mind".
One person found this helpful
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twitchy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A moving book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 5, 2013
A very well written book as all hers are. Written with deep feeling but not self pitying. Would have liked to have known more about her husbands children.
3 people found this helpful
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Alan Brant
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nothing was the same
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 25, 2013
Written by a very erudite psychiatrist who has a personal knowledge of bipolar illness and who explains how she managed the loss, by cancer,of her husband.
6 people found this helpful
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dinesh
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Understanding grief and celebrating love
Reviewed in India on May 30, 2021
Nothing was the same - sequel to the author''s 1995 memoir An Unquiet mind. It is a memoir of her life with her husband and her husband''s loss to cancer. She also has beautifully and quite successfully charted out the distinction between grief and depression. She writes...See more
Nothing was the same - sequel to the author''s 1995 memoir An Unquiet mind. It is a memoir of her life with her husband and her husband''s loss to cancer. She also has beautifully and quite successfully charted out the distinction between grief and depression. She writes ''Grief is at heart if the human condition. Much is lost with death, but not everything...there is a grace In death. There is life.'' This book serves dual purpose - her tribute to honour the love and life she shared with her husband and to describe clearly grief and how she endured loneliness and moving on with life, with her husband''s memories. As she writes ''with the death of my husband, I lost many of my dreams, but not the ability to dream.''
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2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale

2021 Nothing Was the new arrival Same: online A Memoir sale